Thursday, November 30, 2006

Finding Area

Please explain the way(s) in which you found the area of the figures on labsheet 2.1

13 comments:

Jen R said...

I made the shape into a full square and subtracted the triangles from the number of squares in the shape...get it??

Katelyn H said...

I Found my answers by making the polygon into a square or rectangle. Then finding the area of the space outside the original polygon. Then i subtracted it from the area of the whole square or rectangle.

Anonymous said...

The simplest way to find out the area of the figures is to count the squares in the figure but if there is no squares in a figure then you have to count the half squares.


Dylan Tozier

Nathan C. said...

I aranged the shapes into peices by squares and triangles and added them all together and i got my answer but, sometimes i would have to make a rectangle around a triangle and split the area of the rectangle in half and it would give me my answer

Darius B. said...

I split the shape into small pieces and counted them up. A other stratagy I used is I put a rectangle around it and found the area of the rectangle and cut the tringle in half and got my answer.

Anonymous said...

You can find the area by drawing lines throungh the squares and then you would piece together the triangles to get squares, and then you would count our squares and that would be your answer.

Charna

Anonymous said...

I add the squares and then figured ways to put the triangles into squares and counted them in square units.

Nick

Anonymous said...

I broke up the shapes up with lines and then I counted the squares. I also put together the triangles that would equal to 1 square and then put it in sq. units.
KAYLA D.

Anonymous said...

I drew lines inside of the shape in which made small and large triangles, and the lines also made squares. Then I made the triangles into squares and then counted all of the squares and there was occasionally a half of a square.

Karina

Anonymous said...

I drew lines connecting the squares then took the extra triangles and made them into squares and I doubled a triangle then divided by to, to get the area
Cody Gould

Ken said...

In all the figures but 5 I broke down the figure into smaller shapes and found the area of those then I added them all together to find the area. In number 5 I found this strategy very difficult so I dicided to create a outer box around the shape and found the area of it. Then I found the area of the space in the box that wasn't part of the shape. I subtracted the two areas and came up the answer.

Will Pelletier said...

One way is that you could connect the dots and a square with 4 points connected is considered 1 unit of measurement. a triangle that is half of that square is a half unit of measurement. a long triangle that extends 3 points then 1 up that is 3.5 units of measurment and so on this is a good meathod to use because all you have to do after you connect the dots by first cutting the shape in half and then labeling it all you have to do is add the units then you will be done

-Will Pelletier

Anonymous said...

What a great idea...Student Technology Showcase with activities for the attendees! Awesome!